Nov 062012
 

I uploaded a photo very similar to this one here. I don’t know why, but I wasn’t quite satisfied with it. I’m a lot happier with this version.

Three red boats in a harbor with water reflections of the boats and blue sky with clouds in Stykkisholmur Iceland

Sep 252012
 

In the Snæfellsnes peninsula, where we took a detour  on our way to the Westfjords, is a beautiful old fishing village called Stykkishólmur. We stopped off for lunch where I had the biggest mussels I’ve ever seen. They were delicious. Then, I wandered down to the harbor for a few photos before continuing on our way.

Red boats with others with a blue sky and calm water docked in a old fishing village in Stykkishólmur, Iceland

 

Mar 112012
 

This photo was from last week. I dashed out because I realised there was going to be a great sunset. I planned on getting out to Ferry Reach but left too late. I stopped off on the way and grabbed this photo of a fishing boat sat in its harbor at day’s end.

As I was rushing I shot this handheld using my 70-300mm lens to get in close to the boats. I took 3 exposures and then used Photoshop to align the images prior to running them through Photomatix.

Little fishing boat anchored in its harbor in Bermuda at sunset.

Feb 112012
 

As mentioned before, our 3 week journey through 3 countries in Africa ended with two days of relaxation at the Paradis Malihide in Gisenyi. It was the perfect way to unwind. This is another photo of the fishermen making their way out onto Lake Kivu, to work their nets through the night in search of talapia and little black sambassa. They have to fish with nets because, as Cameron discovered after an hour casting his fly into the lake, these are the only two types of fish in the lake and neither of them is carnivorous. Once Cameron discovered this, he turned to teaching one of the waiters how to fly cast. Across the lake, through the haze, you can see the hills of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Fishermen on Lake Kivu, Gisenyi, Rwanda, heading out at night to work their nets from their triple hulled boat in search of talapia and little black sambassa.

Dec 302011
 

If you stay at the Paradis Malihide in Rwanda you’ll get to watch these fishermen leaving at about 6pm each day in these huge rowboats to fish lake Kivu for sambassa and tilapia. They stay out all night, returning at about 7am the next day. The canoes are made of three hulls, attached by beams. The paddling happens in the two outriggers and it takes the a long time to get up to speed.

On our first day there we heard them singing on their way out and ran, in the rain to the docks to watch. Looking out at this departure is incredible as at least a dozen of these giant canoes slowly make their way to deeper water. The spindly bits sticking out each end of the canoes are for stretching their nets out.

Lake Kivu, Rwanda fishermen leaving in canoes which are made of three hulls attached by beams and a spindly bit to hold the nets.